Mac os x tiger su virtualbox

macos - enabling virtual machine Guest Additions on a Mac host and Mac guest - Ask Different

These bundles were put together by "that-ben" and are intended to be the easiest possible for beginners. Nevermind the yellow screen with a VRAM partition not found error, it will go past this without any problem. Networking is fully functional thanks to the sungem driver that's already pre-configured in these downloads.

Right out of the box, it will network through your host machine but on its own subnet branch. The virtual machine's IP will be like Your Windows host IP would likely be something like See also: Basilisk II - a 68K emulator with floppy support. I always wondered why I couldn't write and create folders which is also, in fact, a write operation from the unix point of view on my other Mac's AFP share. Finder always complained about insufficient rights — even when I was trying to write to the user's own home folder on the other Mac.

Ok, maybe it was too obvious: My users had the same name but different user IDs. I wouldn't have been surprised when that would've happened on my linux or BSD boxes - but with Apple products? No way, I thought. But I was wrong. Now, my problem was: I couldn't imagine that it's possible to change the user ID uid or UniqueID in Apple's terms without any problems — taking into account that Mac OS X is still something like a heavily customized BSD ok, no ranting here please, I know the differences. While most of the information is still true with Snow Leopard and above, the process and some of the commands used should be modified slightly.

There may be a problem with this procedure when FileVault 2 full disk encryption is enabled according to javadoug's comment below. First of all, don't do this while you are logged in as the user whose uid you want to change. Seriously, don't do that. The imho best way is to use " sudo ". With sudo you have at least two options:. Another clean way of doing this is as the root user. Afterwards, log in as root as described in Apple's article. I have received feedback from several users that issuing the "dscl. From what I understand this seems to have something to do with the way elevated user privileges were obtained.


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I have not experienced this error using the "sudo -s" command, so please try this. YMMV though. As noted in the article I referred to earlier, the ownership of the user's files has to be changed on every filesystem the user had written to. Remember that you have to check the ownership of files on every filesystem that the user had written to. But that was not all. Mac OS X has some special files and folders that have the old uid as part of their names.

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These include on my Mac at time of writing, ymmv :. For every of the above you have to do something like you may have a look at Guido's tip below - thanks Guido! Finder creates folders like these on every local filesystem you move things to Trash from. Therefore, you have to check every filesystem for the existence of a folder named.


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If you don't do this, you may possibly end up in wasted space but I haven't checked this. If you want to check if there are remaining files or directories that have the old uid in their name, you can, again, use find thanks Tim! As Thomas stated below, it's wise to reboot your machine after this procedure you're absolutely right Thomas. Otherwise strange things happen if you try to log in with the changed user id. For further information please consult the original article I took this information from. Skip to navigation Personal tools Log in.

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Advanced Search…. Ok, let's get going: 0. Prerequisites First of all, don't do this while you are logged in as the user whose uid you want to change. With sudo you have at least two options: You could prefix "sudo" to each of the commands given below but read the comments below as you will have some problems.

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Verify that the uid has changed: dscl. Change ownership of the user's files As noted in the article I referred to earlier, the ownership of the user's files has to be changed on every filesystem the user had written to. Rename special files and folders But that was not all. Finalize: reboot As Thomas stated below, it's wise to reboot your machine after this procedure you're absolutely right Thomas.

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Further information For further information please consult the original article I took this information from. Update This is still working on Update I recently used this procedure on OS X Worked as expected. Update Still works with Sierra Update Just used the steps above on a Mojave Mac Filed under: Mac OS X.

Anonymous says: Jan 20, AM. Thanks so much for this guide! Thanks again! Anonymous says: Feb 02, PM.

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I'm glad it helped. You are absolutely right, Aaron. I've updated the guide. Thanks for your hint! Anonymous says: Jan 26, AM. I used sudo rather than root for this process. With sudo, it appeared impossible to enter some directories where there was a file needing renaming.

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In this case, do a "sudo mv" but you'll have to put the directory name in as well. That seemed to work. In the case of launchd. A useful guide - thanks! Personally, as an old Linux guy I prefer working as root. But for this guide I think it's best to use the root user over the sudo approach because using sudo implies that you work as a different non-privileged user what may but doesn't necessarily have to be the case.

Using the root user, you don't run into the mentioned problems entering folders that you don't have access to. In the end, using sudo or the root user is mostly just a matter of preference. It turned out that there were too many files and folders which carried in their names without being related to the uid anyhow but only a few to none I don't remember relevant ones that should have been renamed.

So I did it exactly as you suggest. I've updated the how-to accordingly. Thanks for your hint, Tim! Great discussion guys. I didn't mention it earlier, but I used sudo for this entire process as well. Also, with sudo, there's no chance I'll forget to disable root when I'm done. I think Roman's exactly correct. It's usually a matter of personal preference.

Anonymous says: Feb 03, AM. Yet another sudo discussion? But sometimes I tend to use the root account, especially when I have to use lots of admin commands - or write some how-to that should be easy to use.